phonebloks
phonebloks:

What happens with our broken phones?
By Klara Friman
Have you ever wondered what happens with old mobile phones that you throw away? The one you had before the one you have now, and the one before that? The mobile phone industry produces new models at an increasing pace, so there’s a high probability that you’ve gotten rid of a phone in the last year.
Phonebloks are trying to prevent these phones from being thrown away for (almost) no reason.
By aiding the industry in developing modular mobile phones we hope that the they will change for, what we think, is the better. We are not there yet, and mobile phones are thrown away for (almost) no reason.
So, what happens to them?
Planned obsolescence means that our phones today are designed to fail or lose their value. Either because they cannot be fixed or because they’re not compatible with new updates. A result of this is that approximately 90 percent of discarded mobile phones end up in landfill.
The phone you threw away last year ended up with 150 millions other mobile phones in a pile, ready to be filled in. Each of these phones consists of a number of materials extracted from different places on the planet and for each discarded phone, a new one is produced (ready to be discarded in a year or so). 
All this because you don’t throw away your old phone without buying a new one, right?
The manufacture of electronic equipment is one of the fastest growing industries and mobile phones is one of its biggest sectors. There are a lot of advantages with people getting connected through mobile technology. In many developing countries mobile phones are used to send money safely. Millions of people, who until recently were without bank accounts, are now able to use their phones for safe money transfer. The increased availability of information and communications technology (ICT) is helping a lot of people out of poverty. ICT has been seen to stimulate economic development, support education and facilitate agriculture.
Unfortunately, the resources in the world are not infinite. Remember that pile of 150 million mobile phones from last year? Well, that’s just for Europe and the USA. Now add the phones of four fast growing populations representing 40% of the world total; Brazil, Russia, India and China, and it’s no wonder that resources are getting scarce.
The plastics in a mobile phone are (for the most part) produced out of non­-renewable crude oil and the metals used are rare and thus only exist in limited amounts. To put all this material in landfills seems to be the last thing we want to do, from every perspective. 
To prevent that the materials in your phone becomes waste the United Nations (U.N.) is giving the following recommendations:
First; reduce the waste by minimizing the use of material in the first place, Second; reuse the phone, if it’s still working give it to someone else, and Third; recycle the phone.
These three steps; reduce, reuse and recycle, are referred to as “The 3R’s”. The 3R’s are used as a strategy when nations all over the world work to reduce their waste. Sometimes steps four and five, Energy Recovery and Disposal, are included to represent the common but less preferred ways of handling these materials. (See image above.)
If you continue to read our upcoming posts on this topic we will try to clarify the differences between the five steps and try to explain how your phone is handled depending on where it ends up.

phonebloks:

What happens with our broken phones?

By Klara Friman

Have you ever wondered what happens with old mobile phones that you throw away? The one you had before the one you have now, and the one before that? The mobile phone industry produces new models at an increasing pace, so there’s a high probability that you’ve gotten rid of a phone in the last year.

Phonebloks are trying to prevent these phones from being thrown away for (almost) no reason.

By aiding the industry in developing modular mobile phones we hope that the they will change for, what we think, is the better. We are not there yet, and mobile phones are thrown away for (almost) no reason.

So, what happens to them?

Planned obsolescence means that our phones today are designed to fail or lose their value. Either because they cannot be fixed or because they’re not compatible with new updates. A result of this is that approximately 90 percent of discarded mobile phones end up in landfill.

The phone you threw away last year ended up with 150 millions other mobile phones in a pile, ready to be filled in. Each of these phones consists of a number of materials extracted from different places on the planet and for each discarded phone, a new one is produced (ready to be discarded in a year or so). 

All this because you don’t throw away your old phone without buying a new one, right?

The manufacture of electronic equipment is one of the fastest growing industries and mobile phones is one of its biggest sectors. There are a lot of advantages with people getting connected through mobile technology. In many developing countries mobile phones are used to send money safely. Millions of people, who until recently were without bank accounts, are now able to use their phones for safe money transfer. The increased availability of information and communications technology (ICT) is helping a lot of people out of poverty. ICT has been seen to stimulate economic development, support education and facilitate agriculture.

Unfortunately, the resources in the world are not infinite. Remember that pile of 150 million mobile phones from last year? Well, that’s just for Europe and the USA. Now add the phones of four fast growing populations representing 40% of the world total; Brazil, Russia, India and China, and it’s no wonder that resources are getting scarce.

The plastics in a mobile phone are (for the most part) produced out of non­-renewable crude oil and the metals used are rare and thus only exist in limited amounts. To put all this material in landfills seems to be the last thing we want to do, from every perspective. 

To prevent that the materials in your phone becomes waste the United Nations (U.N.) is giving the following recommendations:

First; reduce the waste by minimizing the use of material in the first place, Second; reuse the phone, if it’s still working give it to someone else, and Third; recycle the phone.

These three steps; reduce, reuse and recycle, are referred to as “The 3R’s”. The 3R’s are used as a strategy when nations all over the world work to reduce their waste. Sometimes steps four and five, Energy Recovery and Disposal, are included to represent the common but less preferred ways of handling these materials. (See image above.)

If you continue to read our upcoming posts on this topic we will try to clarify the differences between the five steps and try to explain how your phone is handled depending on where it ends up.

ajtechknow

ajtechknow:

On this week’s “TechKnow,” we work with scientists who are trying to unlock the mysteries of one of the world’s top predators—the tiger shark. 

"A holy grail in shark work is to determine some of these areas using for mating or gestating giving birth," says Dr. Neil Hammerschlag of the University of Miami’s R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Lab. 

By inserting small tags—about the size of a AA battery—and installing about 30 hydrophones throughout the area of the Bahamas they’re studying, they’ll be able to track the sharks’ ultrasonic signals for seven years. 

For more, go to our site and be sure to watch aljazeeraamerica on Saturday night at 7:30PM ET/4:30PM PT.

bakeddd
renniesane:

Low Fat, Low Carb, High Protein Nutella
• 1 scoop vanilla whey protein (1/3c) • 1 scoop regular casein (1/3c) • 1/2 to 3/4 c. Milk of choice • 2-4 drops hazelnut extract (or to taste) • 2-3 tbsp cocoa powder • (optional) 1 spoon hazelnut butter (or a few hazelnuts)
—> blend ingredients together until your desired consistency is reached. If too thick, add milk.
—> ENJOY! x
Renniesane / tumblr
Makes 8-10 servings. Per serving: Calories: 42 Fats: 0.4 Protein: 7 Carbs: 2.3 Fiber: 1  Sugar: 0.9
Adapted/Image from: http://www.gluten-free-vegan-girl.com/

renniesane:

Low Fat, Low Carb, High Protein Nutella

• 1 scoop vanilla whey protein (1/3c)
• 1 scoop regular casein (1/3c)
• 1/2 to 3/4 c. Milk of choice
• 2-4 drops hazelnut extract (or to taste)
• 2-3 tbsp cocoa powder
• (optional) 1 spoon hazelnut butter (or a few hazelnuts)

—> blend ingredients together until your desired consistency is reached. If too thick, add milk.

—> ENJOY! x

Renniesane / tumblr

Makes 8-10 servings. Per serving:
Calories: 42
Fats: 0.4
Protein: 7
Carbs: 2.3
Fiber: 1 
Sugar: 0.9

Adapted/Image from:
http://www.gluten-free-vegan-girl.com/

txchnologist

Txch This Week: Self-Bruising Fabric And The Controversy Over Gravity

txchnologist:

image

By Norman Rozenberg

This week on Txchnologist, we explored space, drones, insects and powerful eye scanners capable of scanning irises that are up to about 21 feet away. 

First, NASA has chosen a space ship design inspired by the Wild West. This craft is designed to slow down an asteroid’s spin and maneuver it much like a cowboy would a cow.

The farms of the future may play home to flying drones and ground-crawling robots. Agriculture is a focal point for current research and development, creating opportunities for more sustainable and efficient farming practices.

Txchnologist then looked at some small creatures doing extraordinary things with just a little bit of tension. An MIT lab has turned insects walking on water into art in their study of fluid dynamics, adding an insoluble dye to accentuate how water moves as the insect scurries.

Finally, scientists have designed an eye scanner so powerful that it is capable of scanning irises from a pretty large distance. Rather than walking up to an eye scanner, this new design will be able to scan the eye in the style of Minority Report.  

Now we’re bringing you the news and trends we’ve been following from the world of science, technology and innovation.

Read More

scienceisbeauty
scienceisbeauty:

The magnetic field is thought to be largely generated by an ocean of superheated, swirling liquid iron that makes up Earth’s the outer core 3000 km under our feet. Acting like the spinning conductor in a bicycle dynamo, it generates electrical currents and thus the continuously changing electromagnetic field. Other sources of magnetism come from minerals in Earth’s mantle and crust, while the ionosphere, magnetosphere and oceans also play a role. ESA’s constellation of three Swarm satellites is designed to identify and measure precisely these different magnetic signals. This will lead to new insight into many natural processes, from those occurring deep inside the planet, to weather in space caused by solar activity.
Source: Swarm Constellation, ESA Space in Images
More: ESA’s magnetic field mission Swarm

scienceisbeauty:

The magnetic field is thought to be largely generated by an ocean of superheated, swirling liquid iron that makes up Earth’s the outer core 3000 km under our feet. Acting like the spinning conductor in a bicycle dynamo, it generates electrical currents and thus the continuously changing electromagnetic field. Other sources of magnetism come from minerals in Earth’s mantle and crust, while the ionosphere, magnetosphere and oceans also play a role. ESA’s constellation of three Swarm satellites is designed to identify and measure precisely these different magnetic signals. This will lead to new insight into many natural processes, from those occurring deep inside the planet, to weather in space caused by solar activity.

Source: Swarm Constellation, ESA Space in Images

More: ESA’s magnetic field mission Swarm

ajtechknow

ajtechknow:

How to wrangle one-ton tiger sharks for scientific research in the open ocean:

1) Insert a pump that pushes oxygenated saltwater through the shark’s gills (and gives her something to bite down on). Run a sonogram, take blood and fin samples, insert tracker.

2) Push her gently back into the water.

3) Let go.

4) Whenever possible, swim for a bit with the shark, petting her back.

For more, visit our site and watch aljazeeraamerica on Saturday at 7:30PM ET/4:30PM PT.